There’s a lot going on in the tech world. I can’t open a paper or read my emails without coming across some new development each day. Behind these developments are men and women working to build new systems and challenge our current ways of thinking. I want to highlight three millennial women who are doing even more to empower other women in their fields.

Isis Wenger

Isis Wenger

Inadvertently thrust into the spotlight last month when an advertising campaign recruiting engineers for OneLogin in San Francisco went live and then received sexist backlash from the public, Isis Wenger has turned what could have been just another stab at women in tech into a positive campaign. Wenger’s #ILookLikeAnEngineer hashtag took off from its first tweet. She created a Twitter page for the campaign, and is hosting #ILookLikeAnEngineer events and calling for supporters to contact her for collaborative efforts. In her original response to people’s comments, Wenger wrote, “I didn’t want or ask for any of this attention, but if I can use this to put a spotlight on gender issues in tech I consider that to be at least one win.” Wenger plans to continue building this movement and advocating for gender equality in engineering.

Corinne Warnshuis

Corinne Warnshuis

The Executive Director of Girl Develop It, Corinne Warnshuis is empowering women to take on the tech world. I had the pleasure of meeting Warnshuis earlier this year at a GDI event in Chicago and she is truly a strong advocate and great leader for this organization. Community focused, Warnshuis believes that women are wholly capable of accomplishing everything. Through her work with GDI, she strives to provide platforms and meetup groups across the country to support women in their learning. She sees the education of women on how to code as a way to promote involvement in the development of open source projects, which serves only to be an asset to the overall development of new an improving programs.

Angie Chang

Angie Chang

A long-time advocate of getting women into tech, Angie Chang currently serves as the Vice President of Strategic Partnerships at Hackbright Academy, which offers a 10-week fulltime software development training program for women. Seeing the great disparity of gender representation in the tech world, Chang took action and cofounded Women 2.0 in 2006 with a mission to bring more women into the tech industry as leaders, founders, and investors. Women 2.0 currently provides arenas for women in tech to learn, network, develop ideas, and pitch to investors. Chang’s work with both organizations, as well as her Bay Area Girl Geek Dinners, strives to show women that tech and other traditionally male fields are completely accessible to women, too.

Alissa Trumbull

Alissa Trumbull

Alissa M. Trumbull recently co-founded #BizGalz, a Twitter chat starting in September 2015 geared for women in all stages of life and career. She is also one-half of the Social Outlaws, a new blog dedicated to the areas of social media and social business. Passionate about business ethics, Alissa seeks opportunities to strengthen individuals and organizations through the application of best practices and human understanding. She is also a graphic designer, voracious reader, and fitness enthusiast. Always remember that the more love you pour into the world, the greater your reward. Don't be afraid to risk for what's important!
Alissa Trumbull

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